Dr. Maureen's Blog


This is my way of staying connected with friends and family while I travel to Haiti on a medical relief trip. I am so grateful to have an opportunity to help with the devastation in Haiti and expect it to be challenging, intense and most likely a very moving experience. Thank you to everyone who became a part of the effort by donating medical supplies and encouraging me to take this trip. Please send love, humor and support this way because I may need it! Thanks, everybody!
At the school which has been temporarily transitioned to a relief worker camp,  the classrooms walls are left exactly as they were on January 12th.  The earthquake struck around 4:30 in the afternoon and most of the kids were outside playing afterschool sports.  The director of the school already had an earthquake action plan and it was put to use.  Everyone gathered outside on the soccer field.  The teachers and the director drove around Port-au-Prince later that day to bring back  orphans who were displaced so they could sleep safely on the school’s soccer field. 35 more rumbles occurred on that long night. The directors called a meeting and in a matter of one hour decided to convert the school campus to a relief worker camp. Three days after the quake a group of trauma surgeons with Humedica (German Humanitarian Aid) arrived and stayed at Quisqueya School.  They brought their high-powered equipment for removing limbs, but sadly they wore out after a day and they had to resort to other means such as army knives. (Sorry if this is too much).  The 12th grade students were amazing and took to the streets within 3 days to offer their skill of translating for doctors.  They’ve been working really hard and are growing up fast!  School is still in session here with K-12 classes and 60 students amidst the hustle bustle of relief workers and aid organizations.

At the school which has been temporarily transitioned to a relief worker camp, the classrooms walls are left exactly as they were on January 12th. The earthquake struck around 4:30 in the afternoon and most of the kids were outside playing afterschool sports. The director of the school already had an earthquake action plan and it was put to use. Everyone gathered outside on the soccer field. The teachers and the director drove around Port-au-Prince later that day to bring back orphans who were displaced so they could sleep safely on the school’s soccer field. 35 more rumbles occurred on that long night. The directors called a meeting and in a matter of one hour decided to convert the school campus to a relief worker camp. Three days after the quake a group of trauma surgeons with Humedica (German Humanitarian Aid) arrived and stayed at Quisqueya School. They brought their high-powered equipment for removing limbs, but sadly they wore out after a day and they had to resort to other means such as army knives. (Sorry if this is too much). The 12th grade students were amazing and took to the streets within 3 days to offer their skill of translating for doctors. They’ve been working really hard and are growing up fast! School is still in session here with K-12 classes and 60 students amidst the hustle bustle of relief workers and aid organizations.